Improving Writing skills in Children

Improving Writing skills in Children

Improving Writing skills in Children

Writing skills improvement in children differ from one child to another. Don’t panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn’t even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child’s progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally.

The importance of writing skills can never be over-stated because this forms the basis of the child’s intellect and learning.

It’s exciting when your child’s scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing skills is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don’t stress out if your child isn’t even interested in writing.

A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it’s still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an “x.”

Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.


Don’t panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn’t even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child’s progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 

It’s exciting when your child’s scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don’t stress out if your child isn’t even interested in writing.

A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it’s still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an “x.”

Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.

Don’t panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn’t even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child’s progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally.

It’s exciting when your child’s scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don’t stress out if your child isn’t even interested in writing.

A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it’s still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an “x.”

Regardless of where your child is on the writing skills spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.

Here’s a LINK to other great products that would help you achieve this.

Get the best baby care products HERE


One thought on “Improving Writing skills in Children

  1. Thank you for another fantastic article. Where else could anyone get that type of information in such an ideal way of writing? I’ve a presentation next week, and I’m on the look for such info.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *